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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
east policy to president jimmy carter, mark ginsberg. thank you for joining us tonight. we've tapped into your wisdom individually many times in the past. let's begin sequentially and go through where things are beginning with libya. where this appeared to begin. what do we know about the derivation of these protests and what caused it? >> i think right now, the administration has backed off -- initial impression this might be connected with al-qaeda. there are reasons we can go into why that was a plausible conjecture. it appears to have been it was a group, unlike al-qaeda is not a transnational group. it is a libyan extremist islamist, armed group. therefore, very dangerous to libya. and from everything we can tell, they either opportunistically seized on this or caused it to happen. it's quite different from cairo in the sense it's not even clear there was a spontaneous gathering of a crowd there at all. clearly, there was a decision at some point by ansar says is a rogue group. there was a decision to use
doesn't have to be played under his rules. >> ambassador ginsberg, if we could look at the region broadly, a vexing question facing the united states right now is what's in the best interest of the u.s.? a sort of friendly cooperative dictator, though they may be brutally repressive to the people or a messy, uncertain democracy like in egypt and libya right now. >> the genie's out of the bottle in the middle east. the fact of the matter is every one of the countries going through a transition and it's going to take many acts to follow before we know what's going to happen, whether it's in egypt, syria, saudi arabia or iran. the problem is right now the united states standing in the region has deteriorated rapidly in the last couple of years under president obama. since his cairo speech. most unfortunate. i'm the last person to want to see that. i think the president had the best of intentions to try to rebuild ties with the muslim world but the high expectations of what to deliver versus the changes taking place have created a circumstance where there's great disappointment with t
that a wonderful person, ginsberg, leaves the court. she's very much beloved in that court even by -- i learned if from your books how much they get along, she and scalia, for example. maybe he leaves. can a president of the center left like obama or a president who seems to be on the right right now like romney, can they make a 180 degree switcharoo. could they take the ginsberg seat and give it to the right? would it get past a simple majority? >> the fact is most supreme court nominations get through. robert bork didn't get through in 1987. harriet miers withdrew at the end of the president bush's term. by and large supreme court appointments get through, but we have not seen a liberal replace a conservative in a very long time, maybe 1993 when byron white was replaced by ruth ginsburg, but if, for example, the conservative -- one of the conservative justices leaves in a second obama term, that will be the world war 3 of all time because the conservative movement in this country has embraced their version of the constitution as a fundamental aspect of what they believe in. more than the demo
allen ginsberg. so we really tried to be very clear that poetry has been an impressive part of american history, and that america is have been very committed to both writing and reading poetry. and i think that continues today. >> what about religious books? >> well, we do have a holographic the bible. a lot of the books, while they would necessarily be associated with a religion, have a moralistic or a kind of do good tone to them. and we really felt that that is more representative of america. than would be a particular religious books. so we tried to look at the values of america, her spiritual sort of persona, rather than looking at particular religious books. >> how did you get your start here at the library of congress? >> oh, my goodness. well, i started here over 30 years ago as the first special assistant to the law librarians, fairly fresh out of law school. i absolutely fell in love with the library of congress, and 30 plus years ago, as today, you cannot keep me aay. i'm going to work every morning. and i think that working here and being here surrounded by books, manuscript
to the shoulder, southbound b-w parkway approaching 50. still slow going getting through carrollton and ginsberg southbound on the b-w parkway. building volume is on 95 virginia. in very slow through garrissonville to quantico. on the brakes on prince william parkway to the occoquan. early jam making he drive from urbana to clarksburg, you are on the brakes southbound into germantown. that's the latest. amtrak is breaking the speed limit in the northeast corridor. it is operating fast trains 165 miles an hour. the tests are being done from massachusetts. all locations may someday have that speed. speed is 150.p federal regulations require a test before the regular operating speed is raised. is 52 degrees. >> she rose to fame by rescuing watch, but actress might need help .o stay on the show >> ♪ >> what the judges had to say performance on the when we switched to fios, we got better tv, better phone, better internet. [ male aouncer ] it's time to get more for your money. upgrade to verizon fios internet, tv and phone with our best price online: just $84.99 a month, guaranteed for one year with
us is mark ginsberg former ambassador to morocco. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning. >> how troubling is this to you, sir? >> oh, it's extremely troubling. i know libya well. i obviously know north africa well. the fact that a colleague in the foreign service and other members of the consulate may have been killed on a premeditated attack on a consulate is extraordinarily disturbing. it's the first u.s. ambassador that has lost his life in the line of duty since 1979. benghazi has been particularly troublesome to the central libyan government. it has always been the hotbed of islamic extremism in libya. we cannot underestimate the travails that the libyan government still has in trying to consolidate control over the country and the fact of the matter is, is that there are extremist elements operating in eastern benghazi and this clearly had to be a premeditated attack on the consulate and it's just a terrible shame because chris was one of the greatest arabist diplomats in the region, someone who dedicated many years to helping to consolidate freedom in libya. he worked in
that probably even libyans haven't shared. >> reporter: mark ginsberg is a former ambassador to morocco. >> he was one of those people who dedicated his life to reconciliation between the arab and the united states. he was a peace corps volunteer. he joined the foreign service and obviously committed his life to not only reconstruction and rehabilitation of arab societies, but also focused on libya quite a bit. >> in speaking to americans, and muslims today throughout the washington area, we heard the same message over and over. they hope that the assassination of ambassador stevens does not derail the partnership between the united states and the new libya. wendy and jim? >> christ gordon, thank you. we will be continuing to follow this story. we'll have more on the deadly attacks. the violent protest in the middle east, and there is also new reaction to this. you can also stay up to date on nbcwashington.com. >>> for the second time in three weeks, prince george's county is dealing tonight with the murder of a high school student. both crimes remain unsolved. pat collins joins us from capito
. these good people -- justice ginsberg, now how often do we agree? [laughter] >> a lot, actually. >> really? [laughter] >> mostly unanimous. >> unanimous cases, yes. [laughter] i agree on the unanimous cases. [laughter] i like that. [laughter] there is one category of cases, unanimous cases. but she is a good person. she is a fabulous judge. you know, we are friends but i think that is when you want. they still believe and work together to try to get right but don't change their mind just because they are there because it is. you want them to think the same way you had at the convention and we the people, the ratification debate. i'm going to spend time going back simply because that is the time you talk about people actually saying what the believe. people actually fighting about it. people actually caring, writing articles, the federalist papers. people traveling in having meetings at home in their churches. but having people meeting in their town halls all over the country be dating. and this is fascinating. people actually read the constitution. that's something that's new. they read it
. so we have walt whitman, allen ginsberg. here they tried to be very clear that poetry has been an impressive part of america's history and that americans have been very committed to both writing and reading poetry. i think that continues today. >> what about religious books? >> we do have a holographic pile a lot of the books, while they would not necessarily be associated with the religion have the moralistic or kind of a do good tone to the. and we really felt that is more representative of america then would be a particular religious book. so we tried to look at the values of america, her spiritual sort of persona. rather than looking a particular religious books. >> roberta shaffer, headed to get your start? >> i started here over 30 years ago as the first special assistant to law library. fairly fresh out of law school. absolutely fell in love with the library of congress. thirty plus years ago as today you cannot keep me away. a room to work every morning, and i think that working here and being here surrounded by books, manuscripts, musical scores, movies, the whole gamb
. >> john: thank you. ruth ginsberg is 131 years old -- >> but she doesn't look a day over 35. >> john: that's right. even if you are a republican you just show up and vote on the first wednesday of november all right? [ laughter ] >> john: let's go to paul in nevada. good morning, you are on the "stephanie miller show." >> caller: good morning, john, frank, and it's a real pleasure to talk to you, kelly. i loved your father i thought he was acutely cognizant and was not fooled by the smoke and mirrors. >> john: and neither are the listeners to "stephanie miller show." >> he had an experience with coke and mirrors, but -- [ laughter ] >> caller: that was a good one. >> well done frank. >> caller: the quip of romney having his birther joke there were nuns in the background that were having a huge laugh on that. >> john: as a child of a former nun i was embarrassed by that. >> caller: yeah. and i originally am from washington, d.c., and i sew george carlin at the constitution hall, it was one of the best moments of my life, because i loved george carlin i always thou
published their first major books within weeks of each other. i follow that with allen ginsberg, james baldwin, christopher isherwood, tennessee williams was also working at this time too, this is like the first wave, and they caught a lot of grief for what they wrote. right after world war ii, homosexuality was illegal in all 48 states. you couldn't talk openly as a gay person. but you could write fiction about it and say i'm not writing about myself, i'm writing about these other people who are fictional. everybody saw through this white lie and understood what was going on. but they caught a little use from critics about it. the critics couldn't say, oh, you're clearly a homosexual, that would've been liable at this time. they found other ways to kind of complaint and attack and criticize. this first-generation caught a lot of great rema so how explicit are open could a james baldwin be or a christian be? >> they were initially very open. the second novel, giovanni's room, is about -- it's about two white men in paris, one of the great black american writers. before his second novel
, roof dedekind's bird. -- ruth bather ginsberg. my biggest supporter on the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch. and he confirmed that. the hearings when over three days, but there were no hardball questions. so the senators were mostly using me to speak to me to their constituents to show how caring there were, how well- informed they were. [laughter] they spent a lot more time talking benighted. [laughter] -- they spend a lot more time talking than i did. [laughter] i helped to launch the women's rights project. i had been on the council for seven years. there was not a single question, not a single question about my aclu affiliation. i think what it will take is great stakes on both sides of the aisle and this is not the fault of one party rather than the other. the over 30-votes for someone qualified in any case, it will take both sides of the aisle to come together and say it enough, this is not the way it should be. we should be approving judges. a person who is devoted to the law, to do the hard work that is involved. that is what should count. there was a great m
ginsberg when she retires for example. you want to know if there's any practical experience, and the obama at the lustration has declined to defend the defense of marriage act. present romney might decide he would defend the constitutionality of that statute. it does seem like that has a lot of salience and presidential debates. i.t. think it will not happen. here is why. no major national political figure has attacked as publicly since 1996 or before. it is remarkable. the republicans were seeing some political profit in attacking affirmative action given the polls. they do not do it anymore. john kerry said maybe it is time to stop these racial preferences. the democratic leadership council was inching down that road. that is all gone. this is why we get so demonized if we ever raise our voices against affirmative action. part of it was there was an incredibly bitter campaign in california over proposition 29 which banned racial preferences in state programs in 1996. really bitter. i think it is fair to say there is an awful lot of demonizing going on against the supporters of propositio
attorneys with constitutional issues. the first lecture was unconstitutional given by ginsberg of the d.c. circuit. since then and has been subjects ranging from property rights progressivism and is subject of last year's speech which was of the sa of the supreme court review that has just come out and you can get it by going to the qaeda web site. we begin this second decade of the lectures the honorable paul clement as one of the gifted practitioners to appear rick urie before the supreme court. is currently a partner although his practice takes too far and wide. serving from june 2005 through 2008. he served as acting general for were the fiercest more than seven years of service which is the longest period since the 19th century. he argued over 60 cases of course, the case with which we began the conference today. he received his bachelor's degree and a master's degree from cambridge university. he graduated from harvard law school where he was the supreme court editor of the harvard law review. then he clerked coalesce circuit and ford justice scalia and one on to serve as chief co
place. you could see justice begins byrd, now that she is accomplished, she was -- ginsberg, now that she is accomplished, we may see her retire if obama wins. it makes a huge potential shift in the court based on the next president. you could have up to three additional nominees if something else happened and that would give a obama the opportunity to appoint the majority of the members of the supreme court, or it would give romney a chance to possibly shift the balance. anyone replacing justice kennedy will affect the balance, making it easier, assuming the president knows who to pick. >> you said retirements during this term. my prediction would be none. they all seem to be pretty healthy. >> in four years they could think it would be great to have somebody to replace me, but for years is a long time. i will worry about that later, i am having fun now. >> speaking of fun, we please join me in thanking our panel. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> at 5:00 eastern, we will go to the united nations f
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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